7 Pennsylvania Cities People Are Fleeing As Soon As Possible

Pennsylvania is a state with a rich history, diverse culture, and scenic beauty. However, not all of its cities are equally attractive to live in. Some of them are facing serious challenges such as high crime rates, low incomes, poor education, and declining populations. Here are seven Pennsylvania cities that people are fleeing as soon as possible, according to the latest census data and other sources.

1. Chester

Chester is a city in Delaware County, located on the Delaware River. It was once a thriving industrial hub, but it has suffered from deindustrialization, poverty, and violence. Chester has the highest crime rate in the state, with 85.5 violent crimes per 10,000 residents in 2019. It also has the lowest median household income, at $29,954. The population of Chester has declined by 7.6% since 2010, to 33,988 in 2019.

2. Johnstown

Johnstown is a city in Cambria County, located in the Allegheny Mountains. It is famous for its steel industry and the 1889 flood that killed over 2,000 people. However, Johnstown has been struggling with economic decline, unemployment, and drug abuse. Johnstown has the second-highest poverty rate in the state, at 37.9%. It also has the lowest median home value, at $44,400. The population of Johnstown has decreased by 9.5% since 2010, to 19,195 in 2019.

3. Reading

Reading is a city in Berks County, located in the southeastern part of the state. It was once a center of manufacturing, commerce, and culture, but it has faced many challenges such as urban decay, corruption, and crime. Reading has the third-highest poverty rate in the state, at 36.4%. It also has the second-lowest median household income, at $31,158. The population of Reading has dropped by 2.3% since 2010, to 88,375 in 2019.

4. Erie

Erie is a city in Erie County, located on the shore of Lake Erie. It is the fourth-largest city in the state, and a major port and tourist destination. However, Erie has also suffered from the loss of manufacturing jobs, racial tensions, and environmental issues. Erie has the fourth-highest poverty rate in the state, at 26.9%. It also has the third-lowest median home value, at $86,800. The population of Erie has fallen by 6.4% since 2010, to 95,508 in 2019.

5. Scranton

Scranton is a city in Lackawanna County, located in the northeastern part of the state. It is the sixth-largest city in the state, and the birthplace of former President Joe Biden. However, Scranton has also faced financial difficulties, political scandals, and population decline. Scranton has the fifth-highest poverty rate in the state, at 23.5%. It also has the fourth-lowest median household income, at $39,066. The population of Scranton has shrunk by 1.5% since 2010, to 76,653 in 2019.

6. Harrisburg

Harrisburg is the capital city of Pennsylvania, located on the Susquehanna River. It is the ninth-largest city in the state, and a center of government, education, and culture. However, Harrisburg has also dealt with fiscal crisis, infrastructure problems, and crime. Harrisburg has the sixth-highest poverty rate in the state, at 22.9%. It also has the fifth-lowest median household income, at $41,011. The population of Harrisburg has grown by only 0.2% since 2010, to 49,271 in 2019.

7. Altoona

Altoona is a city in Blair County, located in the central part of the state. It is the tenth-largest city in the state, and a hub of transportation, health care, and retail. However, Altoona has also experienced economic stagnation, social issues, and population loss. Altoona has the seventh-highest poverty rate in the state, at 22.6%. It also has the sixth-lowest median household income, at $41,305. The population of Altoona has declined by 4.7% since 2010, to 43,702 in 2019.

Conclusion

These seven Pennsylvania cities are among the most undesirable places to live in the state, according to various indicators such as income, crime, education, and population. Many people are leaving these cities in search of better opportunities and quality of life elsewhere. However, some of these cities are also trying to revitalize themselves by attracting new businesses, improving public services, and enhancing their cultural assets. Whether these efforts will succeed or not remains to be seen.

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